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116Warning: imagecopyresampled() expects parameter 1 to be resource, boolean given in /home/maryann3/public_html/shop/system/library/image.php on line 118Warning: Division by zero in /home/maryann3/public_html/shop/vqmod/vqcache/vq2-catalog_controller_product_category.php on line 403 Nuts & Seeds

Nuts & Seeds

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Almonds Imported NP 1kg

Almonds Imported NP 1kg

Non Pareil - means without equal or "simply the best"Almonds are the only alkaline forming nut, ours are grown without chemical pesticides and fertilizers, and are a highly nutritious source of protein (20-25%) - this is as much as chicken or fish and meat, but raw so fully usable by the body. Almonds are also a great source of magnesium and other minerals, Vitamin E, essential fatty acids (6 & 3) and Calcium (24%). The calcium in almonds is considered 22 x more usable than calcium in cows milk.Great in smoothies, lightly toasted in Jim Bright's Cabbage, corn (cut off cob or thawed from frozen), lime or lemon juice, a dash of Mary-Ann's EV olive oil, fresh coriander or cilantro and Mary-Ann's Seasoning Salt toss and tuck in mmm..You can used pumpkin or sunflower seeds in place of almonds in most recipes if you prefer a more reasonably priced source of plant proteins, fibre and essential fatsSmoothie Recipe:30g (a tight handful) Almonds, blended with frozen or fresh strawberries and pineapple, fresh or 100% pure apple juice, makes a delicious and nutritious smoothie.Optional: Add Aim's Propeas - taste like dessertInstant smoothie: Place ingredients in a shaker-bottle, 2 Dessert spoons ground almond flour - make your own by grinding almonds in a blender or grinder until smooth1-2 heaped tsp Propeas, a pinch of Aim's Redibeets for a pink colour with 250ml Berry juice mixture or Aloe Berry NectarAdd ice if needed.Shake well and serve.Instant energy and nutrition for anyoneAlmond flour can be used in all baking. Great for gluten free products. Use to make cup cakes, bread and cakesMy all time  Favourite Almond salad (from my friend Jim Bright is Kansas4 cups shredded cabbagehandful chopped coriander (cilantro)2 cups sweetcorn cut off the cobHalf to 1 cup lightly toasted almonds coarsely choppedMary-Ann's Seasonings salt (you have to use this it makes it!juice of 1 lime or lemon 1-2 Tbsp.  Mary-Ann's Extra Virgin olive oiloptional diced tomatoesdiced red pepperMary-Ann's dried olivesCombine and tuck in!!My daughter Meredith's favourite teenage snackThis is my daughter Meredith's favourite snack when growing up (she is now in her 30's)Mary-Ann's Raw almonds and Mary-Ann's raw honeymix well and eat I like to add our ground cinnamon - it is the best tasting cinnamon ever (actually it known as cassia and this is a form of cinnamon with this unique flavorAlmond Mayonnaisehalf a cup of Mary-Ann's raw almondsquarter cup Mary-Ann's EV olive oil1-2 tsp Mary-Ann's Garlic & Herb salt1-2 tsp Mary-Ann's mustard seeds1 cup filtered waterjuice of 1-2 lemonsBlend at high speed until smooth and creamy adjust seasoning and add more lemon juice of not tangy enough You can also add raw honey or fructose for sweetness or replace the water with fresh or bottled apple juice (preservative free naturally!)Keep in fridge for up to 1 week or the freezer for months - freeze in ice cube trays for easy use.Almond Milk1 cup Mary-Ann's raw almonds4-6 cups (1 - 1 & half liter) filtered water or half apple juiceoptional 1 scoop Aim's Propeas (Yummy)Blend at high speed until very smooth and creamy - you can filter in a fine sieve to remove the fibre if you prefer - freeze the fibre and add to smoothiesVegan Almond Gluten-free Cake 1 cup almond milk1 tsp. Mary-Ann's organic apple cidervinegar1 cup, plus 2 Tbs. Gluten-free flour1/3  cup almond flour1½ tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. salt½ cup fructose1/3 cup coconut oil1 tsp. vanilla extract2 tsp. almond extractDirections: Preheat your oven to 180°C/350°F degrees and grease and flour your cake pan.Whisk the vinegar into the almond milk and set aside.In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, almond meal, baking powder and salt.In a separate bowl, combine the fructose, oil, extracts and almond milk mixture.Make a well in your dry ingredients and pour in the wet.Stir until just combined and only a few clumps remain.Pour into the prepared cake pan and cook for 30 - 35 minutes, or until the edges brown and pull away from the pan.Let sit for about 5 minutes before removing from pan and letting cool on a wire rack.Sprinkle with powdered fructose and fresh berries and enjoy.. ..

$27.72

Almonds Imported NP 250g

Almonds Imported NP 250g

Non Pareil - means without equal or "simply the best"Almonds are the only alkaline forming nut, ours are grown without chemical pesticides and fertilizers, and are a highly nutritious source of protein (20-25%) - this is as much as chicken or fish and meat, but raw so fully usable by the body. Almonds are also a great source of magnesium and other minerals, Vitamin E, essential fatty acids (6 & 3) and Calcium (24%). The calcium in almonds is considered 22 x more usable than calcium in cows milk.Great in smoothies, lightly toasted in Jim Bright's Cabbage, corn (cut off cob or thawed from frozen), lime or lemon juice, a dash of Mary-Ann's EV olive oil, fresh coriander or cilantro and Mary-Ann's Seasoning Salt toss and tuck in mmm..You can used pumpkin or sunflower seeds in place of almonds in most recipes if you prefer a more reasonably priced source of plant proteins, fibre and essential fatsSmoothie Recipe:30g (a tight handful) Almonds, blended with frozen or fresh strawberries and pineapple, fresh or 100% pure apple juice, makes a delicious and nutritious smoothie.Optional: Add Aim's Propeas - taste like dessertInstant smoothie: Place ingredients in a shaker-bottle, 2 Dessert spoons ground almond flour - make your own by grinding almonds in a blender or grinder until smooth1-2 heaped tsp Propeas, a pinch of Aim's Redibeets for a pink colour with 250ml Berry juice mixture or Aloe Berry NectarAdd ice if needed.Shake well and serve.Instant energy and nutrition for anyoneAlmond flour can be used in all baking. Great for gluten free products. Use to make cup cakes, bread and cakesMy all time  Favourite Almond salad (from my friend Jim Bright is Kansas4 cups shredded cabbagehandful chopped coriander (cilantro)2 cups sweetcorn cut off the cobHalf to 1 cup lightly toasted almonds coarsely choppedMary-Ann's Seasonings salt (you have to use this it makes it!juice of 1 lime or lemon 1-2 Tbsp.  Mary-Ann's Extra Virgin olive oiloptional diced tomatoesdiced red pepperMary-Ann's dried olivesCombine and tuck in!!My daughter Meredith's favourite teenage snackThis is my daughter Meredith's favourite snack when growing up (she is now in her 30's)Mary-Ann's Raw almonds and Mary-Ann's raw honeymix well and eat I like to add our ground cinnamon - it is the best tasting cinnamon ever (actually it known as cassia and this is a form of cinnamon with this unique flavorAlmond Mayonnaisehalf a cup of Mary-Ann's raw almondsquarter cup Mary-Ann's EV olive oil1-2 tsp Mary-Ann's Garlic & Herb salt1-2 tsp Mary-Ann's mustard seeds1 cup filtered waterjuice of 1-2 lemonsBlend at high speed until smooth and creamy adjust seasoning and add more lemon juice of not tangy enough You can also add raw honey or fructose for sweetness or replace the water with fresh or bottled apple juice (preservative free naturally!)Keep in fridge for up to 1 week or the freezer for months - freeze in ice cube trays for easy use.Almond Milk1 cup Mary-Ann's raw almonds4-6 cups (1 - 1 & half liter) filtered water or half apple juiceoptional 1 scoop Aim's Propeas (Yummy)Blend at high speed until very smooth and creamy - you can filter in a fine sieve to remove the fibre if you prefer - freeze the fibre and add to smoothiesVegan Almond Gluten-free Cake 1 cup almond milk1 tsp. Mary-Ann's organic apple cidervinegar1 cup, plus 2 Tbs. Gluten-free flour1/3  cup almond flour1½ tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. salt½ cup fructose1/3 cup coconut oil1 tsp. vanilla extract2 tsp. almond extractDirections: Preheat your oven to 180°C/350°F degrees and grease and flour your cake pan.Whisk the vinegar into the almond milk and set aside.In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, almond meal, baking powder and salt.In a separate bowl, combine the fructose, oil, extracts and almond milk mixture.Make a well in your dry ingredients and pour in the wet.Stir until just combined and only a few clumps remain.Pour into the prepared cake pan and cook for 30 - 35 minutes, or until the edges brown and pull away from the pan.Let sit for about 5 minutes before removing from pan and letting cool on a wire rack.Sprinkle with powdered fructose and fresh berries and enjoy.. ..

$6.93

Almonds Local TM 1kg

Almonds Local TM 1kg

Texas Mission - The almond with flavour Almonds are the only alkaline forming nut, ours are grown without chemical pesticides and fertilizers, and are a highly nutritious source of protein (20-25%) - this is as much as chicken or fish and meat, but raw so fully usable by the body. Almonds are also a great source of magnesium and other minerals, Vitamin E, essential fatty acids (6 & 3) and Calcium (24%). The calcium in almonds is considered 22 x more usable than calcium in cows milk.Great in smoothies, lightly toasted in Jim Bright's Cabbage, corn (cut off cob or thawed from frozen), lime or lemon juice, a dash of Mary-Ann's EV olive oil, fresh coriander or cilantro and Mary-Ann's Seasoning Salt toss and tuck in mmm..You can used pumpkin or sunflower seeds in place of almonds in most recipes if you prefer a more reasonably priced source of plant proteins, fibre and essential fatsSmoothie Recipe:30g (a tight handful) Almonds, blended with frozen or fresh strawberries and pineapple, fresh or 100% pure apple juice, makes a delicious and nutritious smoothie.Optional: Add Aim's Propeas - taste like dessertInstant smoothie: Place ingredients in a shaker-bottle, 2 Dessert spoons ground almond flour - make your own by grinding almonds in a blender or grinder until smooth1-2 heaped tsp Propeas, a pinch of Aim's Redibeets for a pink colour with 250ml Berry juice mixture or Aloe Berry NectarAdd ice if needed.Shake well and serve.Instant energy and nutrition for anyoneAlmond flour can be used in all baking. Great for gluten free products. Use to make cup cakes, bread and cakesVegan Almond Gluten-free Cake 1 cup almond milk1 tsp. Mary-Ann's organic apple cidervinegar1 cup, plus 2 Tbs. Gluten-free flour1/3  cup almond flour1½ tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. salt½ cup fructose1/3 cup coconut oil1 tsp. vanilla extract2 tsp. almond extractDirections: Preheat your oven to 180°C/350°F degrees and grease and flour your cake pan.Whisk the vinegar into the almond milk and set aside.In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, almond meal, baking powder and salt.In a separate bowl, combine the fructose, oil, extracts and almond milk mixture.Make a well in your dry ingredients and pour in the wet.Stir until just combined and only a few clumps remain.Pour into the prepared cake pan and cook for 30 - 35 minutes, or until the edges brown and pull away from the pan.Let sit for about 5 minutes before removing from pan and letting cool on a wire rack.Sprinkle with powdered fructose and fresh berries and enjoy..My all time  Favourite Almond salad (from my friend Jim Bright is Kansas4 cups shredded cabbagehandful chopped coriander (cilantro)2 cups sweetcorn cut off the cobHalf to 1 cup lightly toasted almonds coarsely choppedMary-Ann's Seasonings salt (you have to use this it makes it!juice of 1 lime or lemon 1-2 Tbsp.  Mary-Ann's Extra Virgin olive oiloptional diced tomatoesdiced red pepperMary-Ann's dried olivesCombine and tuck in!!My daughter Meredith's favourite teenage snackThis is my daughter Meredith's favourite snack when growing up (she is now in her 30's)Mary-Ann's Raw almonds and Mary-Ann's raw honeymix well and eat I like to add our ground cinnamon - it is the best tasting cinnamon ever (actually it known as cassia and this is a form of cinnamon with this unique flavorAlmond Mayonnaisehalf a cup of Mary-Ann's raw almondsquarter cup Mary-Ann's EV olive oil1-2 tsp Mary-Ann's Garlic & Herb salt1-2 tsp Mary-Ann's mustard seeds1 cup filtered waterjuice of 1-2 lemonsBlend at high speed until smooth and creamy adjust seasoning and add more lemon juice of not tangy enough You can also add raw honey or fructose for sweetness or replace the water with fresh or bottled apple juice (preservative free naturally!)Keep in fridge for up to 1 week or the freezer for months - freeze in ice cube trays for easy use.Almond Milk1 cup Mary-Ann's raw almonds4-6 cups (1 - 1 & half liter) filtered water or half apple juiceoptional 1 scoop Aim's Propeas (Yummy)Blend at high speed until very smooth and creamy - you can filter in a fine sieve to remove the fibre if you prefer - freeze the fibre and add to smoothies ..

$18.87

Almonds Local TM 250g

Almonds Local TM 250g

Texas Mission - The almond with flavour!! Darker in colour but a more 'almondy' flavour to them, these little nuts are full of flavour.Almonds are the only alkaline forming nut, ours are grown without chemical pesticides and fertilizers, and are a highly nutritious source of protein (20-25%) - this is as much as chicken or fish and meat, but raw so fully usable by the body. Almonds are also a great source of magnesium and other minerals, Vitamin E, essential fatty acids (6 & 3) and Calcium (24%). The calcium in almonds is considered 22 x more usable than calcium in cows milk.Great in smoothies, lightly toasted in Jim Bright's Cabbage, corn (cut off cob or thawed from frozen), lime or lemon juice, a dash of Mary-Ann's EV olive oil, fresh coriander or cilantro and Mary-Ann's Seasoning Salt toss and tuck in mmm..You can used pumpkin or sunflower seeds in place of almonds in most recipes if you prefer a more reasonably priced source of plant proteins, fibre and essential fatsSmoothie Recipe:30g (a tight handful) Almonds, blended with frozen or fresh strawberries and pineapple, fresh or 100% pure apple juice, makes a delicious and nutritious smoothie.Optional: Add Aim's Propeas - taste like dessertInstant smoothie: Place ingredients in a shaker-bottle, 2 Dessert spoons ground almond flour - make your own by grinding almonds in a blender or grinder until smooth1-2 heaped tsp Propeas, a pinch of Aim's Redibeets for a pink colour with 250ml Berry juice mixture or Aloe Berry NectarAdd ice if needed.Shake well and serve.Instant energy and nutrition for anyoneAlmond flour can be used in all baking. Great for gluten free products. Use to make cup cakes, bread and cakesMy all time  Favourite Almond salad (from my friend Jim Bright is Kansas4 cups shredded cabbagehandful chopped coriander (cilantro)2 cups sweetcorn cut off the cobHalf to 1 cup lightly toasted almonds coarsely choppedMary-Ann's Seasonings salt (you have to use this it makes it!juice of 1 lime or lemon 1-2 Tbsp.  Mary-Ann's Extra Virgin olive oiloptional diced tomatoesdiced red pepperMary-Ann's dried olivesCombine and tuck in!!My daughter Meredith's favourite teenage snackThis is my daughter Meredith's favourite snack when growing up (she is now in her 30's)Mary-Ann's Raw almonds and Mary-Ann's raw honeymix well and eat I like to add our ground cinnamon - it is the best tasting cinnamon ever (actually it known as cassia and this is a form of cinnamon with this unique flavorAlmond Mayonnaisehalf a cup of Mary-Ann's raw almondsquarter cup Mary-Ann's EV olive oil1-2 tsp Mary-Ann's Garlic & Herb salt1-2 tsp Mary-Ann's mustard seeds1 cup filtered waterjuice of 1-2 lemonsBlend at high speed until smooth and creamy adjust seasoning and add more lemon juice of not tangy enough You can also add raw honey or fructose for sweetness or replace the water with fresh or bottled apple juice (preservative free naturally!)Keep in fridge for up to 1 week or the freezer for months - freeze in ice cube trays for easy use.Almond Milk1 cup Mary-Ann's raw almonds4-6 cups (1 - 1 & half liter) filtered water or half apple juiceoptional 1 scoop Aim's Propeas (Yummy)Blend at high speed until very smooth and creamy - you can filter in a fine sieve to remove the fibre if you prefer - freeze the fibre and add to smoothiesVegan Almond Gluten-free Cake 1 cup almond milk1 tsp. Mary-Ann's organic apple cidervinegar1 cup, plus 2 Tbs. Gluten-free flour1/3  cup almond flour1½ tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. salt½ cup fructose1/3 cup coconut oil1 tsp. vanilla extract2 tsp. almond extractDirections: Preheat your oven to 180°C/350°F degrees and grease and flour your cake pan.Whisk the vinegar into the almond milk and set aside.In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, almond meal, baking powder and salt.In a separate bowl, combine the fructose, oil, extracts and almond milk mixture.Make a well in your dry ingredients and pour in the wet.Stir until just combined and only a few clumps remain.Pour into the prepared cake pan and cook for 30 - 35 minutes, or until the edges brown and pull away from the pan.Let sit for about 5 minutes before removing from pan and letting cool on a wire rack.Sprinkle with powdered fructose and fresh berries and enjoy.. ..

$5.39

Cashew pieces 1kg

Cashew pieces 1kg

The best cashews you will ever taste There are at least 15 grades of cashews, we only choose the top 2 to make sure that you get the best. Our cashews contain a healthy amount of protein (15-20%), calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and essential fatty acids. Remember that the fat in raw nuts helps your hormonal system work well and lowers cholesterol levels, but eat in moderation as they are high in energy  ..

$24.64

Cashews Raw 250g

Cashews Raw 250g

Best cashew you ever had! There are at least 16 grades of cashews, we only BUY the top 2 to make sure that you get the best. Our cashews contain a healthy amount of protein (15-20%), calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and essential fatty acids. Remember that the fat in raw nuts helps your hormonal system work well and lowers cholesterol levels. ..

$9.63

Cashews Raw Whole 1kg

Cashews Raw Whole 1kg

Best ever cashew you ever had! There are at least 16 grades of cashews, we only choose the top 2 to make sure that you get the best. Our cashews contain a healthy amount of protein (15-20%), calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and essential fatty acids. Remember that the fat in raw nuts helps your hormonal system work well and lowers cholesterol levels.The best cashews you will ever tasteRemember that the fat in raw nuts helps your hormonal system work well and lowers cholesterol levels, but eat in moderation as they are high in energy  ..

$35.04

Chia Seeds 250g

Chia Seeds 250g

Little miracles seeds high in Omega 3, complete protein and almost every mineral and trace element including calcium and zincChia porridge1 pack of Mary-Ann's chia seeds1 Litre of almond milk (made by blending 1 cup of almonds with 1 litre water until fine and blended (you may sieve this but don't have toadd 2-4 tsp  Mary-Ann's Raw Honey 1 tsp Propeas from Aimwarm gently - keep under 40 degrees C Stir gently with a whisk while heating and serve as is or with cinnamon and more honey or with fresh fruit salad and or Mary-Ann's gluten free muesliDon’t be fooled by the size… these tiny seeds pack a powerful nutritional punch.A 1 ounce (28 grams) serving of chia seeds contains (1, 2):Fiber: 11 grams.Protein: 4 grams.Fat: 9 grams (5 of which are Omega-3s).Calcium: 18% of the RDA.Manganese: 30% of the RDA.Magnesium: 30% of the RDA.Phosphorus: 27% of the RDA.They also contain a decent amount of Zinc, Vitamin B3 (Niacin), Potassium, Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) and Vitamin B2.This is particularly impressive when you consider that this is just a single ounce, which supplies only 137 calories and one gram of digestible carbohydrate!Just so that we’re all on the same page, 1 ounce equals 28 grams, or about 2 tablespoonsThis makes them one of the world’s best sources of several important nutrients, calorie for calorie.To top things off, chia seeds are a “whole grain” food, are usually grown organically, are non-GMO and naturally free of gluten.Bottom Line: Despite their tiny size, chia seeds are among the most nutritious foods on the planet. They are loaded with fiber, protein, Omega-3 fatty acids and various micronutrients.2. Chia Seeds Are Loaded With AntioxidantsAnother area where chia seeds shine is in their high amount of antioxidants These antioxidants protect the sensitive fats in the seeds from going rancid Although antioxidant supplements are not very effective, getting antioxidants from foods can have positive effects on health (6).Most importantly, antioxidants fight the production of free radicals, which can damage molecules in cells and contribute to ageing and diseases like cancer Bottom Line: Chia seeds are high in antioxidants that help to protect the delicate fats in the seeds. They also have various benefits for health.3. Almost All The Carbs in Them Are FiberLooking at the nutrition profile of chia seeds, you see that an ounce has 12 grams of “carbohydrate.”However… 11 of those grams are fiber, which isn’t digested by the body.Fiber doesn’t raise blood sugar, doesn’t require insulin to be disposed of and therefore shouldn’t count as acarb.The true carb content is only 1 gram per ounce, which is very low. This makes chia a low-carb friendly food.Because of all the fiber, chia seeds can absorb up to 10-12 times their weight in water, becoming gel-like and expanding in your stomach Theoretically, this should increase fullness, slow absorption of your food and help you automatically eat fewer calories.Fiber also feeds the friendly bacteria in the intestine, which is important because keeping your gut bugs well fed is absolutely crucial for health Chia seeds are 40% fiber, by weight. This makes them one of the best sources of fiber in the world.Chia seeds contain a decent amount of protein.By weight, they are about 14% protein, which is very high compared to most plants.They also contain a good balance of essential amino acids, so our bodies should be able to make use of the protein in them Protein has all sorts of benefits for health. It is also the most weight loss friendly nutrient in the diet, by far.A high protein intake reduces appetite and has been shown to reduce obsessive thoughts about food by 60% and the desire for night time snacking by 50%Chia seeds really are an excellent protein source, especially for people who eat little or no animal products.6. Chia Seeds Are High in Omega-3 Fatty AcidsLike flax seeds, chia seeds are very high in Omega-3 fatty acidsPlant Omega 3 is converted by the body to EPA and DHA only as and when the body needs it unilke fish oil which is easy to overdoes on resulting in thinning blood and bleeding problems7. Chia Seeds May Improve Certain Blood Markers, Which Should Lower The Risk of Heart Disease and Type 2 DiabetesGiven that chia seeds are high in fiber, protein and Omega-3s, they should be able to improve metabolic health.Rat studies have also shown that chia seeds can lower triglycerides, raise HDL (the “good”) cholesterol and reduce inflammation, insulin resistance and belly fat 8. They Are High in Many Important Bone NutrientsChia seeds are high in several nutrients that are important for bone health.This includes calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and protein.The calcium content is particularly impressive… 18% of the RDA in a single ounce.Gram for gram, this is higher than most dairy products.9. Chia Seeds Can Cause Major Improvements in Type 2 DiabeticsThe most successful application of chia seeds to date was in a study on type 2 diabetic patientsIn this study, 20 diabetic patients received either 37 grams of chia seeds, or 37 grams of wheat bran, for 12 weeks (27).When they got the chia seeds, they saw improvements in several important health markers.Blood pressure went down by 3-6 mm/Hg and an inflammatory marker called hs-CRPwent down by 40%. A risk factor called vWF also decreased by 21%.There was also a small drop in blood sugar, but it wasn’t statistically significant.Given that chia seeds are high in fiber, it does seem plausible that they could help reduce blood sugar spikes after meals, but this needs to be confirmed in studies.11. Chia Seeds Are Easy to Incorporate Into Your DietOkay, this last one is not a health benefit, but important nonetheless.Chia seeds are incredibly easy to incorporate into your diet.The seeds themselves taste rather bland, so you can add them to pretty much anything.They also don’t need to be ground like flax seeds, which makes them much easier to prepare.They can be eaten raw, soaked in juice, added to porridge and puddings, or added to baked goods.You can also sprinkle them on top of cereal, yogurt, vegetables or rice dishes.Because of their ability to absorb both water and fat, they can be used to thicken sauces and even used as egg substitutes in recipes.They can also be mixed with water and turned into a gel.Adding chia seeds to recipes will dramatically boost the nutritional value.They do also seem to be well tolerated… but if you’re not used to eating a lot of fiber, then there is a possibility of digestive side effects if you eat too much at a time.A common dosage recommendation is 20 grams (about 1.5 tablespoons) of chia seeds, twice per day. ..

$3.47

Flax Seed 250g

Flax Seed 250g

Great source of protein, omega fats + minerals like calcium. Grind for maximum benefit. Also aids sluggish bowels.Health BenefitsThe seeds of most plants are rich in nutrients and can provide us with health benefits. Yet flaxseeds are also nutritionally unique and offer us health benefits not found across the board within the seeds food group. The nutritional uniqueness of flaxseeds features three nutrient aspects, and all three play a key role in the outstanding health benefits of this food.Unique Nutrient Features of FlaxseedsThe first unique feature of flax is its high omega-3 fatty acid content. Among all 127 World's Healthiest Foods, flaxseeds comes out number one as a source of omega-3s! The primary omega-3 fatty acid found in flaxseeds is alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA. The ALA in flaxseed has found to be stable for at least 3 hours of cooking at oven temperatures (approximately 300F/150C), which makes it available after ground flaxseeds have been added to baked goods like muffins or breads.The second unique feature of flaxseed is its lignans. Lignans are fiber-like compounds, but in addition to their fiber-like benefits, they also provide antioxidant protection due to their structure as polyphenols. The unique structure of lignans gives them a further health-supportive role to play, however, in the form of phytoestrogens. Along with isoflavones, lignans are one of the few naturally occurring compounds in food that function as weak or moderate estrogens when consumed by humans. Among all foods commonly eaten by humans, researchers rank flaxseeds as the number one source of lignans. Sesame seeds come in second, but contain only one-seventh of the total lignans as flaxseeds. To give a few further examples, sunflower seeds contain about 1/350th as many lignans, and cashews nuts contain about 1/475th as many lignans as flaxseeds.A third unique feature of flaxseeds is their mucilage (gum) content. "Mucilage" refers to water-soluble, gel-forming fiber that can provide special support to the intestinal tract. For example, gums can help prevent the too rapid emptying of the stomach contents into the small intestine, thereby improving absorption of certain nutrients in the small intestine. Arabinoxylans and galactoxylans are included within the mucilage gums found in flaxseeds.This combination of features—omega-3 fatty acids, high-lignan content, and mucilage gums—is a key factor in the unique health benefits of flaxseeds. The specific areas of health benefit described below all draw in some way from this unique combination of nutrients not found in other commonly eaten nuts or seeds.Cardiovascular BenefitsThe primary omega-3 fatty acid in flaxseeds—alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA—can be helpful to the cardiovascular system in and of itself. As the building block for other messaging molecules that help prevent excessive inflammation, ALA can help protect the blood vessels from inflammatory damage. Numerous studies have shown the ability of dietary flaxseeds to increase our blood levels of ALA, even when those flaxseeds have been ground and incorporated into baked goods like breads or muffins. When flaxseeds are consumed, two other omega-3 fatty acids have also been shown to increase in the bloodstream, namely, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Increases in EPA and DPA also help provide inflammatory protection.Protection of our blood vessels from inflammatory damage is also provided by the lignans in flaxseeds. These lignans can inhibit formation of platelet activating factor (PAF), which increases risk of inflammation when produced in excessive amounts. The overall anti-inflammatory benefits of ALA and lignans in flaxseeds has been further corroborated by studies in which flaxseed-enriched baked goods (like muffins) lead to decreases of 10-15% in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. CRP levels are a commonly used indicator of inflammatory status in the cardiovascular system.Risk of oxidative stress in the blood vessels can also be lowered by flaxseed intake. In addition to being a very good source of the mineral antioxidant manganese, polyphenols in flaxseed—including flaxseed lignans—provide measurable antioxidant benefits. The antioxidant benefits of one particular flaxseed lignan, secoisolariciresinol, have been especially well-documented. Decreased lipid peroxidation and decreased presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the bloodsteam have both been associated with flaxseed intake in amounts of approximately 2 tablespoons per day.Intake of flaxseeds has also been shown to decrease the ratio of LDL-to-HDL cholesterol in several human studies and to increase the level of apolipoprotein A1, which is the major protein found in HDL cholesterol (the "good" cholesterol). This HDL-related benefit may be partly due to the simple fiber content of flaxseeds, since 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseed provide about 4 grams of dietary fiber.Although direct studies on flaxseed and blood pressure are limited (and mostly confined to flaxseed oil versus ground flaxseed), numerous studies have shown the ability of increased omega-3 fatty acid intake to help regulate blood pressure and to help reduce blood pressure in persons who have been diagnosed with hypertension. With its excellent content of the omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), flaxseed can definitely help us increase our overall omega-3 intake and, by doing so, decrease our risk of high blood pressure.There is one area of concern that we want to note involving flaxseeds and the cardiovascular system. We've seen one very small-scale study from Canada involving 30 children and teens (ages 8-18), all previously diagnosed with hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol) and given added flaxseed in their diets over a period of 4 weeks. The flaxseed amount was 2 tablespoons, and the form was ground flaxseeds incorporated into breads and muffins. In this study, blood levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol did not significantly change, but blood fat levels (in the form of triglycerides) increased and HDL cholesterol (the "good" cholesterol) decreased. Since we would consider these changes in blood lipids to be unwanted, we believe this study raises some preliminary questions about the role of daily flaxseeds in amounts of 2 tablespoons or above in the diet of children and teenagers who are already known to have high cholesterol. Much more research is needed in this area, but if you are the parent of a child or teen who is already diagnosed with high cholesterol, we recommend that you consult with your healthcare provider about the pros and cons of incorporating flaxseeds into your child's meal plan on a daily basis in any substantial amount.Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory BenefitsIt is important to realize that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits of flaxseed do not apply only to the cardiovascular system. Oxidative stress (which is often related to deficient intake of antioxidant nutrients) and excessive inflammation (which can also be related to deficient intake of anti-inflammatory nutrients) are common risk factors for a wide variety of health problems. These problems include development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, asthma, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. There is preliminary evidence that flaxseed intake can decrease risk of all the problems above by increasing our anti-inflammatory and antioxidant protection.Cancer PreventionThe antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits of flaxseeds also make them a logical candidate for cancer prevention. That's because chronic inflammation (even low level inflammation) and chronic oxidative stress are risk factors for cancer development. In the case of flaxseeds, evidence of risk reduction is strongest for breast cancer, prostate cancer, and colon cancer. Breast cancer and prostate cancer are included in the list of cancers know as "hormone-related" cancers. Their risk reduction may be more closely related to flaxseed than risk reduction for other cancers due to the high lignan content of flaxseed.Three of the lignans found in flaxseeds—secoisolariciresinol, matairecinol, and pinoresinol—can be converted by intestinal bacteria into enterolactone (ENL) and enterodiol (END). ENL and END have direct affects on our hormonal balance and in this way may play an especially important role in hormone-related cancer. In addition to decreased risk of breast and prostate cancer following flaxseed intake, there is also some preliminary evidence that ENL and END may be able to alter the course of hormone-dependent tumors once they are formed. The relationship between flaxseed intake and cancer prevention is complicated, however, due to the important role of gut bacteria in converting secoisolariciresinol and other lignans in flax into enterolactone and enterodiol. This conversion process involves many different enzyme-related steps provided by a complicated mix of gut bacteria including Bacteriodes, Bifidobacterium, Butyribacterium,Eubacterium and others.The lignans provided by flaxseed have also been shown to spark increased activity by certain Phase II detoxification enzymes that are responsible for deactivating toxins in the body. This support of the detox process may help prevent accumulation of toxins that might otherwise act as carcinogens and increase cancer risk.Digestive HealthBenefits of flaxseed for the digestive tract—although mentioned earlier throughout this food profile—are worth repeating here. The strong fiber content of flaxseeds—including their mucilaginous fiber—help to delay gastric emptying and can improve intestinal absorption of nutrients. Flaxseed fibers also help to steady the passage of food through our intestines. Finally, the lignans in flaxseed have been shown to reduce risk of colon cancer. This impressive group of digestive tract benefits is likely to receive more attention in future research studies.Flaxseeds and Post-Menopausal SymptomsWe've seen mixed findings in the area of post-menopausal benefits (such as reduction of hot flashes) and flaxseed intake, with some studies showing significant benefits and other studies showing a lack of significant benefits. However, there continues to be strong interest in flaxseeds and their components (including enterolactone and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside) as potential aids during management of perimenopausal and postmenopausal symptoms as well as during hormone replacement therapy (HRT).This area of flaxseed research is admittedly complex. For example, enterolactone made from flaxseed lignans has been shown to be an estrogen agonist (promoting estrogen production, through increased formation of transcription factors like ER-alpha and ER-beta), as well as an estrogen antagonist (working against estrogen production, through inhibition of enzymes like estrogen synthetase). It's also known to lower the activity of 5-alpha-reductase (an enzyme that converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone) and 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (an enzyme that converts estrone into estradiol). Given this complicated set of circumstances that may vary from one woman to another, it may turn out that flaxseed intake is simply better at lessening menopausal symptoms in some women, and not as good at lessening symptoms in others.Other Health BenefitsAlthough we've already mentioned decreased risk of insulin resistance in relationship to flaxseed intake, we're definitely expected to see more research studies in this area. The strong fiber content, antioxidant content, and anti-inflammatory content of flaxseeds make them a natural here.One final note about the health benefits of flaxseeds involves their feeding to animals. We've seen repeated studies on the content of beef, chicken, and eggs that reflect significantly increased omega-3 content in these foods when flaxseed meal and/or flaxseed oil are added to the diets of cows and chickens. For persons who enjoy these foods in their meal plan on a regular basis, this increased omega-3 content can really add up. Some manufacturers of beef, chicken, and eggs provide omega-3 information on their product packaging. Consumption of certified organic animal foods in which flaxseed was added to the animals' feed can be an effective way of increasing your omega-3 intake.DescriptionThe scientific name for flax—Linum usitatissimum— reveals a lot about our human relationship to this plant. The "linum" part of this name sounds a lot like "linen," which is a fabric that has been made from flax for over 3,000 years. The "usitatissimum" part of its name means "of greatest use" in Latin, and that quality also rings true in our relationship to flax. This plant has served not only as a food source and source of linen, but also for the creation of sails on sailing ships, bowstrings, and body armor. Flaxseed is known in many parts of the world as "linseed," although most of the linseed oil sold in the United States is not food grade and is sold instead for use as a wood finish and preservative.Brown flax and golden flax (sometimes called yellow flax) are the two basic varieties of flax, and they are similar in their nutritional composition, with one important exception. One specific strain of yellow flax called "solin" was been developed by agricultural scientists to be processed and sold as a cooking oil that could substitute for oils like sunflower seed oil. Solin has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a GRAS list food, and it is sometimes being produced under the trademarked name "Linola" (TM). Since solin (Linola TM) only contains about 1/10th of the alpha-linolenic (ALA) content of other the brown and golden flax varieties, it definitely should not be considered equivalent from a nutritional standpoint.One additional clarification about varieties of flax is also important. New Zealand flax, even though it bears the same name, is not related to the flax plant Linum usitatissimum whose flaxseeds we recommend as a World's Healthiest Food. New Zealand flax also has a rich history of use for its fiber content, however, as well as traditional medicinal uses as developed by the Maori peoples of New Zealand.In their raw form, flaxseeds usually range from amber/yellow/gold in color to tan/brown/reddish brown. White or green flaxseeds have typically been harvested before full maturity, and black flaxseeds have typically been harvested long after full maturity. Generally speaking, we recommend avoiding raw flaxseeds that are white, green, or black in color.HistorySometime between 4000 and 2000 BC, flax cultivation became a common practice in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in regions of the Middle East, and there is some evidence that flax cultivation may have started even thousands of years earlier, during the Neolithic Era of approximately 10,000 BC. From the very beginning, the value of flax was both culinary and domestic, since flax fibers could be spun into linen to provide clothing and other textile-related products.To this day, flax cultivation has remained both culinary and domestic, although crop production has become more specialized and wide scale. In the United States and Canada, most commercial flax production involves oilseed varieties of flax, in which the seeds will eventually be dried and crushed and used to produce different grades of oil. Non-food grade flaxseed/linseed oil is used in wood finishes, paints, coatings, and other industrial supplies. Food grade flaxseed/linseed oil can as be used in livestock feed, or as a culinary oil. (It is much more common, however, for livestock feed to contain flaxseed meal versus flaxseed oil.) Oilseed varieties of flax are typically classified as oilseed crops along with soybeans, rapeseed, cottonseed, sunflower seed, and peanuts. Canada is the world's largest producer of oilseed flax, followed by Russia, France, and Argentina.Fiber flax is the other major variety of flax in terms of commercial production. In Europe, France and Belgium are especially large producers of fiber flax. While cotton, wool and silk remain the most popular natural fibers in the global textile market, the global flax market has grown in recent years following increased production of linen products in China.Alongside of these other flax markets, however, has developed a gradually expanding consumer market for flaxseeds themselves, to be considered as uniquely nourishing food. We expect to see food interest in flaxseeds increase, primarily because of their unique nutrient combinations and health benefits.How to Select and StoreFlaxseeds can be purchased either whole or already ground. The two different forms offer distinct benefits. Because flaxseeds can be very difficult to chew, grinding of the seeds prior to consumption can usually increase their digestibility. However, grinding takes time, and pre-ground flaxseeds can have great convenience. On the other side of the coin, pre-ground flaxseeds—while more convenient—also come with a shorter shelf life than whole flaxseeds. Ground flaxseeds—even when carefully packaged in a gas-flushed, light-protective pouch and refrigerated after opening—typically last about 6-16 weeks. Whole flaxseeds, on the other hand, will typically last for 6-12 months when stored in an airtight container in a dark, cool dry spot. If directly refrigerated, they may last for 1-2 years.Whole flaxseeds are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the flaxseeds are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure their maximal freshness. Whether purchasing flaxseeds in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure that there is no evidence of moisture. If you purchase whole flaxseeds, either store them in an airtight container in a dark, dry and cool place or place their airtight container directly in the refrigerator.Ground flaxseeds are usually available both refrigerated and non-refrigerated. If you are purchasing ground flaxseed that is sitting on the store shelf at room temperature, we highly recommended that the flaxseed be packaged in a gas-flushed, vacuum-sealed bag. If you are purchasing ground flaxseed that is found in the refrigerator section, it's not essential that vacuum-sealed packaging be used, but it can still be helpful from a food quality standpoint. Regardless of the form in which you purchase your ground flaxseeds, you should keep their container in the refrigerator after opening. The reason for all of this extra precaution is simple: once flaxseeds are ground, they are much more prone to oxidation and spoilage. Similarly, if you are grinding whole flaxseeds on your own at home (for example, in a small spice or coffee grinder), you'll want to store them in the refrigerator in an airtight container. If using glass, you may also want to use a darkened glass as that will lessen exposure of the ground flaxseeds to light.Flaxseed oil is especially perishable and should always be purchased in opaque bottles that have been kept refrigerated. Flaxseed oil should have a sweet nutty flavor. We never recommend the use of flaxseed oil in cooking, since it is far too easily oxidized. However, it's fine to add flaxseed oil to foods after they have been cooked.  ..

$2.31

Hazel Nut spread 350g

Hazel Nut spread 350g

Better than any other hazelnut spread.. healthier than chocolate! WARNING! This stuff is addictive! INGREDIENTS: Hazelnuts, Raw honey, Coconut Oil, Malted Carob (carob powder, barley malt, fructose, vanilla,Vanilla, Cinnamon.Eat as is on a spoon, or on bread, rice cakes, anywhere anytime!   ..

$12.71

Pumpkin Seeds 250g

Pumpkin Seeds 250g

We have the most delicious pumpkin seeds, which are not only a great source of protein (up to 30%) but also of Omega 3 & 6 fatty acids, zinc, calcium, magnesium, selenium etc, etc etc. Pumpkin seeds are also known to keep parasites at bay and promote prostate health. The very green colour indicates the higher carotene and chlorophyl levels. Combine with our pineapple juice sweetened cranberries or for a savoury snack or sprinkled on a salad with dried olives. ..

$4.24

Sesame Seed Dehulled 250g

Sesame Seed Dehulled 250g

Sesamum indicum (indicum meaning from India) is indigenous to the East Indies. Usage dates back to 3 000 BC when 5 000 years ago, the Chinese burned sesame oil not only as a light source but also to make soot for their ink-blocks. Some people believe sesame seeds originated in Egypt where it has been grown for its nutritional content for centuries. African slaves brought sesame seeds, which they called benn seeds, to America, where they became a popular ingredient in Southern dishes. Through the ages, the seeds have been a source of food and oil. Sesame seed oil is still the main source of fat used in cooking in the Near and Far East. Sesame seeds may be the oldest condiment known to man dating back to as early as 1600 BC. They are highly valued for their oil, which is exceptionally resistant to rancidity. Open sesame, the famous phrase from the Arabian Nights, reflects the distinguishing feature of the sesame seed pod, which bursts open when it reaches maturity. Nutritional profile Not only are sesame seeds a great source of manganese and copper, they are also a good source of calcium (131 mg/100 g), protein (26.4 g/100 g), magnesium (347 mg/100 g), phosphorous (776 mg/100 g), vitamin B1, zinc and dietary fibre. In addition to these important nutrients, sesame seeds contain two unique substances: sesamin and sesamolin. Both of these substances belong to a group of special beneficial fibres called lignans, and have been shown to have a cholesterol-lowering effect in humans,1 and to prevent high blood pressure2-4 and increase vitamin E supplies in animals.5,6 Sesamin has also been found to protect the liver from oxidative damage.7,8 Sesame seeds are a very good source of copper and calcium. Just a quarter-cup of sesame seeds supplies 74% of the daily value (DV) for copper, 31.6% of the DV for magnesium, and 35.1% of the DV for calcium. This rich assortment of minerals translates into health benefits. Copper is known for its use in reducing some of the pain and swelling of rheumatoid arthritis. Copper's effectiveness is due to the fact that this trace mineral is important in a number of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant enzyme systems. In addition, copper plays an important role in the activity of lysyl oxidase, an enzyme needed for the cross-linking of collagen and elastin (the ground substances that provide structure, strength and elasticity in blood vessels, bones and joints). Magnesium is useful for: Preventing the airway spasm in asthma Lowering high blood pressure, a contributing factor in heart attack, stroke and diabetic heart disease Preventing the trigeminal blood vessel spasm that triggers migraine attacks Restoring normal sleep patterns in women who are experiencing unpleasant symptoms associated with menopause. Calcium helps to to: Protect colon cells from cancer-causing chemicals Prevent the bone loss that can occur as a result of menopause or certain conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis Prevent migraine headaches in those who suffer from them Reduce PMS symptoms during the luteal phase (the second half) of the menstrual cycle.9 There is some controversy about sesame seeds and calcium, because there is a substantial difference between the calcium content of hulled versus unhulled sesame seeds. When the hulls remain on the seeds, one tablespoon of sesame seeds contains about 88 mg of calcium. When the hulls are removed, this same tablespoon contains about 37 mg (about 60% less). Tahini (a spreadable paste made from ground sesame seeds) is usually made from hulled seeds (seeds with the hulls removed, called kernels), and so it usually contains less calcium. The term ‘sesame butter’ sometimes refers to tahini made from sesame seed kernels, or it can also be used to mean a seed paste made from whole sesame seeds – hulls included. Although the seed hulls provide an additional 51 mg of calcium per tablespoon of seeds, the calcium found in the hulls appears mostly to be found in the form of calcium oxalate. This form of calcium is different from the form found in the kernels, and it is a less absorbable form of calcium. So even though a person would be likely to get more calcium from sesame seeds or sesame seed butter that contained the hulls, there is a question about how much more calcium would be involved. It would definitely be less than the additional 51 mg found in the seed hulls. In addition there would also, of course, be a question about the place of hull-containing sesame seeds on an oxalate-restricted diet. Bone mineral density is another reason for older men to make zinc-rich foods such as sesame seeds a regular part of their healthy way of eating. Although osteoporosis is often thought to be a disease for which postmenopausal women are at highest risk, it is also a potential problem for older men. Almost 30% of hip fractures occur in men, and 1 in 8 men over 50 years will have an osteoporotic fracture. A study10 of 396 men ranging in age from 45 - 92 years published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found a clear correlation between low dietary intake of zinc, low blood levels of the trace mineral, and osteoporosis at the hip and spine. Phytosterols are compounds found in plants that have a chemical structure similar to cholesterol, and when present in sufficient amounts in the diet are believed to reduce blood levels of cholesterol, enhance immune response and decrease risk of certain cancers. In a study11 published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry sesame seeds were found to be the highest in phytosterols out of all edible nuts and seeds Sesame seeds provide two very important amino acids, i.e. methionine and tryptophan. Every cell in your body contains methionine. When your body is saturated with methionine, the excess is converted to choline. Choline aids in the ability to handle cholesterol and helps the process by which the body produces energy instead of fat. Tryptophan is a precursor to niacin and serotonin. Niacin is known to promote a youthful skin and healthy hair. Serotonin helps you sleep well, feel happy and be calm. Sesame seeds contain as much protein as chicken or fish (22 - 27% depending on the crop). Sesame seeds also contain a large percentage of the B-complex vitamins, particularly thiamin, riboflavin and niacin (B1, B2 and B3). The most nutritious form of sesame seeds is raw tahini. Humans cannot digest sesame seeds unless they are ground finely like in tahini. This is also the most delicious way to eat sesame seeds. An excellent reason to eat sesame seeds (or preferably tahini) is for the essential fatty acids omega-3 and 6. Both are essential to the functioning of the endocrine (hormonal) system, the system responsible for almost every body function from fertility to heart, liver, lung, skin and kidney function. Sesame seeds are also high in lecithin in a more usable form than that from soy beans as it is an emulsified form. Lecithin is essential for the processing of fats in the body, helps our brain and central nervous system function efficiently and keeps cholesterol soluble. As a result it keeps cholesterol from the artery walls and also helps prevent gall and kidney stones. Hummus and halva (the Middle Eastern sweet) both have tahini as their main ingredient and are made in a variety of ways. Hummus is made with chickpeas, lemon juice, herbs and spices and the healthiest halva to eat is the kind made with raw honey or fruit juice. ..

$4.24

Sunflower Seed raw 500g

Sunflower Seed raw 500g

Looking for a health-promoting snack? Enjoy a handful of mild nutty tasting sunflower seeds with their firm but tender texture to take care of your hunger and get a wealth of nutrition at the same time. Sunflower seeds are available at your local market throughout the year.Sunflower seeds are the gift of the beautiful sunflower that has rays of petals emanating from its bright yellow, seed-studded center. The flower produces grayish-green or black seeds encased in tear-dropped shaped gray or black shells that oftentimes feature black and white stripes. Since these seeds have a very high oil content, they are one of the main sources of polyunsaturated oil. Sunflower Seeds, dried0.25 cup(35.00 grams)Calories: 204GI: lowNutrientDRI/DV vitamin E82% copper70% vitamin B143% manganese34% selenium34% phosphorus33% magnesium28% vitamin B628% folate20% vitamin B318%This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Sunflower seeds provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System. Health BenefitsDescriptionHistoryHow to Select and StoreTips for Preparing and CookingHow to EnjoyIndividual ConcernsNutritional ProfileReferencesHealth BenefitsLooking for a health-promoting snack? A handful of sunflower seeds will take care of your hunger, while also enhancing your health by supplying significant amounts of vitamin E, magnesium and selenium.Anti-Inflammatory and Cardiovascular Benefits from Sunflower Seeds' Vitamin ESunflower seeds are an excellent source of vitamin E, the body's primary fat-soluble antioxidant. Vitamin E travels throughout the body neutralizing free radicals that would otherwise damage fat-containing structures and molecules, such as cell membranes, brain cells, and cholesterol. By protecting these cellular and molecular components, vitamin E has significant anti-inflammatory effects that result in the reduction of symptoms in asthma, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis, conditions where free radicals and inflammation play a big role. Vitamin E has also been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer, help decrease the severity and frequency of hot flashes in women going through menopause, and help reduce the development of diabetic complications.In addition, vitamin E plays an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin E is one of the main antioxidants found in cholesterol particles and helps prevent free radicals from oxidizing cholesterol. Only after it has been oxidized is cholesterol able to adhere to blood vessel walls and initiate the process of atherosclerosis, which can lead to blocked arteries, heart attack, or stroke. Getting plenty of vitamin E can significantly reduce the risk of developing atherosclerosis. In fact, studies show that people who get a good amount of vitamin E are at a much lower risk of dying of a heart attack than people whose dietary intake of vitamin E is marginal or inadequate.Sunflower Seeds' Phytosterols Lower CholesterolPhytosterols are compounds found in plants that have a chemical structure very similar to cholesterol, and when present in the diet in sufficient amounts, are believed to reduce blood levels of cholesterol, enhance the immune response and decrease risk of certain cancers.Phytosterols beneficial effects are so dramatic that they have been extracted from soybean, corn, and pine tree oil and added to processed foods, such as "butter"-replacement spreads, which are then touted as cholesterol-lowering "foods." But why settle for an imitation "butter" when Mother Nature's nuts and seeds are a naturally rich source of phytosterols—and cardio-protective fiber, minerals and healthy fats as well?In a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers published the amounts of phytosterols present in nuts and seeds commonly eaten in the United States.Sesame seeds had the highest total phytosterol content (400-413 mg per 100 grams), and English walnuts and Brazil nuts the lowest (113 mg/100grams and 95 mg/100 grams). (100 grams is equivalent to 3.5 ounces.) Of the nuts and seeds typically consumed as snack foods, sunflower seeds and pistachios were richest in phytosterols (270-289 mg/100 g), followed by pumpkin seeds (265 mg/100 g).Calm Your Nerves, Muscles and Blood Vessels with Sunflower Seeds' MagnesiumSunflower seeds are a good source of magnesium. Numerous studies have demonstrated that magnesium helps reduce the severity of asthma, lower high blood pressure, and prevent migraine headaches, as well as reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke.Magnesium is also necessary for healthy bones and energy production. About two-thirds of the magnesium in the human body is found in our bones. Some helps give bones their physical structure, while the rest is found on the surface of the bone where it is stored for the body to draw upon as needed.Magnesium counterbalances calcium, thus helping to regulate nerve and muscle tone. In many nerve cells, magnesium serves as Nature's own calcium channel blocker, preventing calcium from rushing into the nerve cell and activating the nerve. By blocking calcium's entry, magnesium keeps our nerves (and the blood vessels and muscles they ennervate) relaxed. If our diet provides us with too little magnesium, however, calcium can gain free entry, and the nerve cell can become overactivated, sending too many messages and causing excessive contraction. Insufficient magnesium can thus contribute to high blood pressure, muscle spasms (including spasms of the heart muscle or the spasms of the airways symptomatic of asthma), and migraine headaches, as well as muscle cramps, tension, soreness and fatigue.Improved Detoxification and Cancer Prevention from Sunflower Seeds' SeleniumSunflower seeds are also a good source of selenium, a trace mineral that is of fundamental importance to human health. Accumulated evidence from prospective studies, intervention trials and studies on animal models of cancer has suggested a strong inverse correlation between selenium intake and cancer incidence. Selenium has been shown to induce DNA repair and synthesis in damaged cells, to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells, and to induce their apoptosis, the self-destruct sequence the body uses to eliminate worn out or abnormal cells.In addition, selenium is incorporated at the active site of many proteins, includingglutathione peroxidase, which is particularly important for cancer protection. One of the body's most powerful antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase is used in the liver to detoxify a wide range of potentially harmful molecules. When levels of glutathione peroxidase are too low, these toxic molecules are not disarmed and wreak havoc on any cells with which they come in contact, damaging their cellular DNA and promoting the development of cancer cells. Its selenium richness is another reason that sunflower seeds can make a good snack.DescriptionSunflower seeds are the gift of the beautiful sunflower, a plant with rays of petals emanating from its bright yellow, seed-studded center. The sunflower's Latin scientific name, Helianthus annuus, reflects its solar appearance since helios is the Greek word for sun, and anthos is the Greek word for flower.The sunflower produces grayish-green or black seeds encased in tear-dropped shaped gray or black shells that oftentimes feature black and white stripes. Since these seeds have a very high oil content, they are one of the main sources used to produce polyunsaturated oil. Shelled sunflower seeds have a mild nutty taste and firm, but tender texture. Their taste is oftentimes compared with the Jerusalem artichoke (not to be confused with the bulb artichoke), another member of the Helianthus family.HistoryWhile sunflowers are thought to have originated in Mexico and Peru, they are one of the first plants to ever be cultivated in the United States. They have been used for more than 5,000 years by the Native Americans, who not only used the seeds as a food and an oil source, but also used the flowers, roots and stems for varied purposes including as a dye pigment. The Spanish explorers brought sunflowers back to Europe, and after being first grown in Spain, they were subsequently introduced to other neighboring countries. Currently, sunflower oil is one of the most popular oils in the world. Today, the leading commercial producers of sunflower seeds include the Russian Federation, Peru, Argentina, Spain, France and China.How to Select and StoreSunflower seeds are sold either shelled or unshelled and are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the sunflower seeds are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure the seeds' maximal freshness.When purchasing unshelled seeds, make sure that the shells are not broken or dirty. Additionally, they should be firm and not have a limp texture. When purchasing shelled seeds, avoid those that appear yellowish in color as they have probably gone rancid. In addition, if you are purchasing sunflower seeds from a bulk bin, smell them to ensure that they are still fresh and have not spoiled.Since sunflower seeds have a high fat content and are prone to rancidity, it is best to store them in an airtight container in the refrigerator. They can also be stored in the freezer since the cold temperature will not greatly affect their texture or flavor.Tips for Preparing and CookingTips for Preparing Sunflower SeedsIf you want to remove the shells from unshelled sunflower seeds, there are easier ways to remove the shell than by hand, which requires a lot of diligence and time. The quickest way to shell sunflower seeds is to grind them in a seed mill and then place them in cold water where the shells will float to the top and can be skimmed off with a slotted spoon.While not as efficient, another alternative for those who don't have seed mills (which is probably the majority of us) is to put a small amount of seeds into the bowl of an electric mixer, pulsing the mixer on and off a few times for a few seconds each time, until the shells separate but not too many seeds are crushed. Then plunge the seeds into cold water as described above to separate them from the shells. However, shelled sunflower seeds are plentiful in the stores so there is no need to go through the trouble unless you have harvested them from your garden.How to EnjoyA Few Quick Serving IdeasAdd sunflower seeds to your favorite  salad recipe.Garnish mixed green salads with sunflower seeds.Adding sunflower seeds to to the top of peanut on bread or toast  will give a unique taste and texture.Use fine ground sunflower seeds to dust your vegetables before roasting with in place of flour.Sprinkle sunflower seeds onto hot and cold cereals.Individual ConcernsSunflower seeds are not a commonly allergenic food and are not known to contain measurable amounts of oxalates.Nutritional ProfileSunflower seeds are an excellent source of vitamin E and a very good source of copper and vitamin B1. In addition, sunflower seeds are a good source of manganese, selenium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin B6, folate and niacin.Sunflower Seeds, dried0.25 cup35.00 gramsCalories: 204GI: lowNutrientAmountDRI/DV(%)NutrientDensityWorld's HealthiestFoods Ratingvitamin E12.31 mg (ATE)827.2excellentcopper0.63 mg706.2very goodvitamin B10.52 mg433.8very goodmanganese0.68 mg343.0goodselenium18.55 mcg343.0goodphosphorus231.00 mg332.9goodmagnesium113.75 mg282.5goodvitamin B60.47 mg282.4goodfolate79.45 mcg201.7goodvitamin B32.92 mg181.6goodWorld's HealthiestFoods RatingRuleexcellentDRI/DV>=75% ORDensity>=7.6 AND DRI/DV>=10%very goodDRI/DV>=50% ORDensity>=3.4 AND DRI/DV>=5%goodDRI/DV>=25% ORDensity>=1.5 AND DRI/DV>=2.5%In-Depth Nutritional ProfileIn addition to the nutrients highlighted in our ratings chart, here is an in-depth nutritional profile for Sunflower seeds. This profile includes information on a full array of nutrients, including carbohydrates, sugar, soluble and insoluble fiber, sodium, vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, amino acids and more.Sunflower Seeds, dried(Note: "--" indicates data unavailable)0.25 cup(35.00 g)GI: lowBASIC MACRONUTRIENTS AND CALORIESnutrientamountDRI/DV(%)Protein7.27 g15Carbohydrates7.00 g3Fat - total18.01 g--Dietary Fiber3.01 g12Calories204.4011MACRONUTRIENT AND CALORIE DETAILnutrientamountDRI/DV(%)Carbohydrate:Starch-- gTotal Sugars0.92 gMonosaccharides-- gFructose-- gGlucose-- gGalactose-- gDisaccharides-- gLactose-- gMaltose-- gSucrose0.88 gSoluble Fiber0.96 gInsoluble Fiber2.05 gOther Carbohydrates3.07 gFat:Monounsaturated Fat6.48 gPolyunsaturated Fat8.10 gSaturated Fat1.56 gTrans Fat0.00 gCalories from Fat162.10Calories from Saturated Fat14.03Calories from Trans Fat0.00Cholesterol0.00 mgWater1.66 gMICRONUTRIENTSnutrientamountDRI/DV(%)VitaminsWater-Soluble VitaminsB-Complex VitaminsVitamin B10.52 mg43Vitamin B20.12 mg9Vitamin B32.92 mg18Vitamin B3 (Niacin Equivalents)4.60 mgVitamin B60.47 mg28Vitamin B120.00 mcg0Biotin-- mcg--Choline19.29 mg5Folate79.45 mcg20Folate (DFE)79.45 mcgFolate (food)79.45 mcgPantothenic Acid0.40 mg8Vitamin C0.49 mg1Fat-Soluble VitaminsVitamin A (Retinoids and Carotenoids)Vitamin A International Units (IU)17.50 IUVitamin A mcg Retinol Activity Equivalents (RAE)0.88 mcg (RAE)0Vitamin A mcg Retinol Equivalents (RE)1.75 mcg (RE)Retinol mcg Retinol Equivalents (RE)0.00 mcg (RE)Carotenoid mcg Retinol Equivalents (RE)1.75 mcg (RE)Alpha-Carotene0.00 mcgBeta-Carotene10.50 mcgBeta-Carotene Equivalents10.50 mcgCryptoxanthin0.00 mcgLutein and Zeaxanthin0.00 mcgLycopene0.00 mcgVitamin DVitamin D International Units (IU)0.00 IU0Vitamin D mcg0.00 mcgVitamin EVitamin E mg Alpha-Tocopherol Equivalents (ATE)12.31 mg (ATE)82Vitamin E International Units (IU)18.34 IUVitamin E mg12.31 mgVitamin K0.00 mcg0MineralsnutrientamountDRI/DV(%)Boron-- mcgCalcium27.30 mg3Chloride..

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